Deer Enclosure (visiting Wang Wei)

Deer Enclosure (visiting Wang Wei)

Loneliness on empty hill
Hearing voices of past visitors
Same when visiting deep forest
Green moss shining in reflected light

Literal translations of classic Chinese poetry can be found at chinese-poems.com. This is my interpretation of a poem by Wang Wei. The literal translation, as provided at chinese-poems.com, is as follows:

Deer Enclosure

Empty hill not see person
Yet hear person voice sound
Return scene enter deep forest
Duplicate light green moss on

 

Image source: Sotheby’s – Deer under Pine Tree, by Shen Quan

More Chinese interpretations can be found here.

Linked to Open Link Night #259 at dVerse Poets Pub.

Drunken Sleep (visiting Tu Mu)

Seeing Robert Okaji’s Thinking of Li Po at Sky’s End reminded me that I’ve had this Chinese interpretation (key word: interpretation!) in my draft folder for a few months. I decided I probably should post it while the calendar says it’s (technically) still autumn – although the snow here would say otherwise.

Drunken Sleep (visiting Tu Mu)

This wine is fit for an autumn rain
in the cold, as leaves fall around the house.
There is no need to go out, only to sleep.
Time for one more cup when this one is empty.

Literal translations of classic Chinese poetry can be found at chinese-poems.com. This is my interpretation of a poem by Tu Mu. The literal translation, as provided at chinese-poems.com, is as follows:

Drunken Sleep

Autumn wine rain in well made
Cold house fall leaf in
Hermit really much asleep
More pour one cup empty

Image source: Harvard Art Museums – Night Rain at Karasaki, by Utagawa Hiroshige

More Chinese interpretations can be found here.

Mountain Travel (visiting Tu Mu)

Mountain Travel (visiting Tu Mu)

A steep stone path climbs the distant cold mountain
with homes high in the white clouds.
I stop the carriage to admire the maples in the evening.
No spring flower can compare to their frosted red leaves.

Literal translations of classic Chinese poetry can be found at chinese-poems.com. This is my interpretation of a poem by Tu Mu. The literal translation, as provided at chinese-poems.com, is as follows:

Mountain Travel

Far on cold mountain stone path slant
White cloud live place be households
Stop carriage because love maple forest evening
Frost leaf red than second month flower

Image source: Wikimedia Commons – Maple in Autumn by Tosa Mitsuoki

More Chinese interpretations can be found here.

A Light Boat with Short Oars (visiting Ouyang Xiu)

A Light Boat with Short Oars

Traveling west on the lake, short oars serve me well,
as I follow the water along the green, curving shore.
The faint sound of pipe music follows me,
flowing through the fragrant grass of the dike.

The water sits like glass in the still air,
holding my gaze as boats pass me without notice.
I sit unaware of my boat’s movement as their ripples reach me,
until startled sandpipers fly past the brush on the bank.

Literal translations of classic Chinese poetry can be found at chinese-poems.com. This is my interpretation of a poem by Ouyang Xiu. The literal translation, as provided at chinese-poems.com, is as follows:

A Light Boat with Short Oars (Picking Mulberries)

Light boat short oar west lake good
Green water gently curving
Fragrant grass long dyke
Faint pipe song everywhere follow

Without wind water surface glaze smooth
Not notice boat move
Little move ripples
Startle rise sand bird brush bank fly

Image source: Wikimedia Commons
(Sandpipers, by Ohara Koson)
More Chinese interpretations can be found here.

Writing of My Sorrow (visiting Mei Yao-ch’en)

 

Writing of My Sorrow

My wife has been taken to the heavens,
and now, my son.
Life leaves my eyes, in tears.
My heart wants to follow.
Rainfall seeps into the earth.
A pearl sinks deeper, to the ocean’s bottom.
The pearl can be found in the water.
Water will be found when you dig in the earth.
But no one returns, once they are truly gone.
All these years, I thought I have known myself.
But as I touch my breast, I ask who this is
wasting away in the mirror.

Literal translations of classic Chinese poetry can be found at chinese-poems.com. This is my interpretation of a poem by Mei Yao-ch’en. The literal translation, as provided at chinese-poems.com, is as follows:

Writing of My Sorrow

Heaven already take my wife
Again again take my son
Two eyes although not dry
(Disc) heart will want die
Rain fall enter earth in
Pearl sink enter sea deep
Enter sea can seek pearl
Dig earth can see water
Only person return source below
Through the ages know self (yes)
Touch breast now ask who
Emaciated mirror in ghost

Image source: The British Museum
Izanami and Izanagi on the Bridge of Heaven, by Totoya Hehhei
More Chinese interpretations can be found here.

dVerse Open Link Night #234

It would seem this poem was on my mind when I wrote What Lies Beneath on 12/14/18.

On Parting (visiting Tu Mu)

On Parting

I am almost alone in my loneliness
Drink in hand, it’s hard to smile
Like the candle’s flame, I long to stay
Like the candle, my tears fall at dawn

On Parting.jpg

Literal translations of classic Chinese poetry can be found at chinese-poems.com. This is my interpretation of a poem by Tu Mu. The literal translation, as provided at
chinese-poems.com, is as follows:

On Parting

Much feeling but seem all without feeling
Think feel glass before smile not develop
Candle have heart too reluctant to part
Instead person shed tear at dawn

Image source: sohu.com
(Plum blossom and red candle, by Qi Baishi)
More Chinese interpretations can be found here.

Ancient Air No. 39 (visiting Li Po)

 

Ancient Air No. 39

Climbing a great height, I look upon the four seas.
From heaven to earth, I can see forever.
The colors of autumn are muted by frost
blown by the coldest desert wind.
As it sweeps across the mighty eastward flowing river,
thousands of clouds billow from its force,
and the sun’s brightness fades
behind the endless cover of white.
Swallows and sparrows nest in the parasol tree,
and a beautiful phoenix finds shelter among jujube thorns.
I’ve come this way many times,
singing as I carry my sword on this difficult road.

Literal translations of classic Chinese poetry can be found at chinese-poems.com. This is my interpretation of a poem by Li Po. The literal translation, as provided at chinese-poems.com, is as follows:

Ancient Air (39)

Ancient Air No 39.jpgClimb high gaze four seas
Heaven earth how vast vast
Frost blanket crowd thing autumn
Wind blow big desert cold
Magnificent east flow water
10,000 thing all billow
White sun cover elapse brilliance
Float cloud without certain end
Wutong nest swallow sparrow
Thorn jujube perch yuan luan
Moreover again return go come
Sword sing travel road difficult

Image source: Wikimedia Commons
(by Wang Shimin, 1666)
More Chinese interpretations can be found here.