dancing on the beach ~ renga

Carpe Diem #1697 Renga with Jane Reichhold … placing the flute
asks us to create a renga (or chain of verses) by following
each provided haiku by Jane Reichhold
(in blue), in any order, with two lines.
A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse)
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

dancing on the beach
I jab a stick into the sky
to break up the blue

sun giving way to shadow
welcome relief of evening

days so complete
words become the calls of birds
the high tide wind

carries the scent of sea foam
mingling with all most pleasant

wind perfumed
from a woman’s shoulder
desert night

carried across the mountains
like a song riding the breeze

placing the flute
against her lips something
slips into place

a tune that piques the senses
with charms that arouse desire

moon white water
lovers in the secret cove
Saturday night

long hours gazing at the stars
wisdom reaching through the years

I’m not old
all night my eyes have held
the ancient stars

until deep dark of night sky
yields to light of morning’s blue

Images source: pexels.com / Dominika Roseclay

the snow of yesterday ~ troiku

Carpe Diem #1691 Troiku Month – The Snow of Yesterday offers
a haiku by Gozan (
in blue) to be used to create a troiku.
~~~~
The haiku by Gozan was written late in life.
A tradition among Zen monks was to write a last haiku,
a jisei or “death haiku,” showing the circle of life.

the snow of yesterday
that fell like cherry blossoms
is water once again
               Gozan

~~~~~~~

the snow of yesterday
does not survive the seasons
memories fading

that fell like cherry blossoms
taking all color with them
no longer falling

is water once again
blurring traces of the past
until all is gone

The haiku by Gozan was written late in life.
A tradition among Zen monks was to write a last haiku,
a jisei or “death haiku,” showing the circle of life.

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Images
desktopnexus.com (cherry blossoms)
Wikimedia Commons (troika)

to listen ~ troiku

to listen,
fine not to listen, fine too…
nightingale
               Chiyo-Ni

~~~~~~~

to listen,
accept the sounds around you
try to understand

fine not to listen, fine too…
being a part of that world
accepting each voice

nightingale
singing for all who listen
knowing when to sing

I try to finish a troiku in one sitting, but it can be time consuming. I set this one aside, so it was not finished before the prompt window closed. The original haiku (in blue) by Chiyo-Ni was provided last week in Carpe Diem #1686 Troiku Month – Nightingale.

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Images
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Roses and Bamboo with Nightingale, by Teisai Hokuba
Wikimedia Commons (troika)

oasis of green ~ troiku

The prompt for Carpe Diem #1690 Troiku Month – butterfly is to write a haiku
about butterflies (
in blue) to be used to create a troiku.

oasis of green
butterflies inside glass house
aerial antics

~~~~~~~

oasis of green
providing year-round delight
with elegant flight

butterflies inside glass house
graced with exotic colors
bright tropical plants

aerial antics
Lepidoptera ballet
on delicate wings

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Images
Butterfly photo taken at St. Louis Butterfly House
and edited with Prisma (click for larger view in new tab)
Wikimedia Commons (troika)