polishing cedar ~ fusion troiku

The prompt for Carpe Diem #1789 The Winter Trees (Crossroads)
starts with two haiku by Yosa Buson (
in blue) to be used
to create a “fusion” haiku which is then to be the base for a troiku.

cutting into with the ax,
I was surprised at the scent.
the winter trees.

unfolding at the
hand of the glass polisher:
a camellia!

               Yosa Buson

polishing cedar
beauty of the grain unfolds
stimulating scents

polishing cedar
respecting treasured heirloom
held in loving hands

beauty of the grain unfolds
revealing further treasures
beloved keepsakes

stimulating scents
reminders of days long gone
held close to the heart

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Image source: wikimedia.org (troika)

walking through wet grass ~ fusion troiku

This response to Carpe Diem #1784 soaking wet (Crossroads)
is past the acceptance window, but here it is, anyway. The challenge is to use two  haiku
by Santōka Taneda (
in blue) to be used to create a “fusion” haiku,
which then is to be the base to create a troiku.

soaking wet
I can’t read the letters
on the signpost

walking through
the bush clover, the pampas grass,
walking on through them
               © Santōka Taneda
~~~~~~~

walking through wet grass
glistening beneath the sun
sign of morning rain

walking through wet grass
in early light’s rising mist
wishing for dry shoes

glistening beneath the sun
reflections like pearls of light
hanging from grass blades

sign of morning rain
erased by touch of mild breeze
sun melting the clouds

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Image sources:
wallpapersafari.com
wikimedia.org (troika)

flock of geese takes wing ~ haiku

 

flock of geese takes wing
ribbon of moonlight shadows
steel rails glistening

This haiku is my response to Carpe Diem #1788
In the Moonlit Night (Revise That Haiku),
which is to revise the following classic haiku by Masaoka Shiki.

the wild geese take flight
low along the railroad tracks
in the moonlit night
              Masaoka Shiki

Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Geese and the Moon, by Ohara Koson

spring warbler spreads wings ~ tanka

spring warbler spreads wings
leaves droppings while taking flight
spoiled rice cake remains
cat walks across veranda
hungry for departed bird

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #110 Carpe Diem Transformation …. Bush Warbler
offers a haiku by Bashō (below, in blue) to be transformed
into a tanka. In a process different from tan renga,
I have revised the original haiku before
adding two lines to create my tanka.

A spring warbler casts
A dropping on the rice cakes –
The veranda edge.

Image source: ukiyo-e.org – Warbler on Red Plum Branch