Anticipation ~ chōka & haiku

My initial reaction to Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 229 #SynonymsOnly, where the words offered are dawn and twilight (to be replaced with synonyms), was to write a haiku.

morning light
anticipated
with sunset

Instead, I decided to write a chōka.

Anticipation

morning lightsailboats at anchor
in the waning evening light
long day on the lake
lapping of waves against hulls
sound of buoys rings
air of anticipation
to feel wind in morning’s light

light of setting sun
brings a night of quiet rest
morning light arrives
waves ripple in reflection
as the cycle continues

Chōka, a Japanese long poem written primarily from the 6th to the 14th century. Chōka have alternating lines of 5 and 7 syllables and an indefinite length (from 7 to 149 lines), ending with an added 7 syllable line. So, 5-7-5-7-5-7-…7, and a length allowing greater themes.

Chōka often were followed by one or more short poems called hanka, or “envoys,” summarizing, supplementing, or elaborating on, the contents of the main poem. Sometimes, a tanka would serve as an envoy, and that is what I have written here.

Man’yōshū (“Collection of a Myriad Leaves”) is the oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry (from some time after AD 759) and contains 4,536 waka (classical Japanese poetry). 265 of those are chōka (long poems). The 1940/1965 edition of The Man’yōshū: One Thousand Poems (a translation) is available for download as a PDF from Internet Archive and is some pretty interesting reading.

Image: sunset on the Niagara River at Lake Ontario, Youngstown, New York
                              (click image for larger view in new tab)

with the years that have passed ~ gogyohka ~ ekphrastic poem

with the years that have passed

with the years that have passed
greater than those left to come
moments once frozen in time
blend one into another
as memories become a blur

This gogyohka is my response to Colleen Chesebro’s #Tanka Tuesday
Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 226 #Ekphrastic #Photoprompt
,
with the photo provided by Trent McDonald.

Gogyohka (pronounced go-gee-yoh-kuh)
~ a form of Japanese poetry pioneered by Enta Kusakabe in the 1950s
~ 5-line poetry ~ like tanka, but with freedom from restraints
~ no fixed syllable requirement
~ no conventions regarding content
~ brief lines in keeping with the tradition of Japanese short verse

her gentle spirit ~ gogyohka

For Mother’s Day and Colleen Chesebro’s #Tanka Tuesday
#Poetry Challenge No. 224, #Poet’sChoice
.

her gentle spirit
a mother’s essence
etched into my heart
missing her
peaceful soul


Gogyohka (pronounced go-gee-yoh-kuh)
~ a form of Japanese poetry pioneered by Enta Kusakabe in the 1950s
~ 5-line poetry ~ like tanka, but with freedom from restraints
~ no fixed syllable requirement
~ no conventions regarding content
~ brief lines in keeping with the tradition of Japanese short verse

This gogyohka started as two senryū, but I wanted to express it in one verse.

her essence
etched into my heart
loving soul

a gentle spirit
memories that never leave
peaceful soul lingers

scattered clouds drift by ~ gogyohka

scattered clouds drift by
a beautiful day to be out
a tufted titmouse agrees
sunning turtles splash as I pass
my paddle slices the water

 

This gogyohka (off-prompt for Day 6 of napowrimo.net) is my response to Colleen Chesebro’s #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 220, #Poet’sChoice.


Gogyohka (pronounced go-gee-yoh-kuh)
~ a form of Japanese poetry pioneered by Enta Kusakabe in the 1950s
~ 5-line poetry ~ like tanka, but with freedom from restraints
~ no fixed syllable requirement
~ no conventions regarding content
~ brief lines in keeping with the tradition of Japanese short verse

NaPoWriMo 2021

~ Day 6 ~

Image: The Moreau River in April, Missouri

early sunset ~ tanka

early sunset
harvest moon rising
dancing leaves
wonderful colors
a treat for the eyes

The first full moon (of two) this October is the harvest moon which typically
appears in late September.  Many places (particularly in the northeast US)
are reporting fall colors weeks ahead of the norm.

This tanka is my response to three different prompts:
Frank Tassone’s #Haikai Challenge #158: Harvest Moon
Carpe Diem – 8th Anniversary asks for a festive haiku or tanka.
Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge
No. 197, #SpecificForm: Tanka
Also shared with Open Link Night #275 at dVerse Poets Pub

Photos
Harvest Moon, 01 October 2020,
Full Moon with Missouri’s Capitol, Jefferson City, Missouri – 01 October 2020
The dome is bathed in red light to honor the firefighters
who gave their lives to serve our
community
(click on images for larger view in new tab)