color gone ~ gogyohka

color gone
as night awakens
dim dusk light
crescent moon rises
pale color returns

This gogyohka is my response to Colleen’s #TankaTuesday Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 247, #SynonymsOnly at Word Craft: Prose and Poetry,
using dusk and color for the offered words, twilight and hue.
I suppose you could say it’s a “short-line”tanka, as the syllables are consistent.

Photo: 27 April 2020 (click for larger view in new tab)

Word Weaving – The Moons of Autumn

Three poems I submitted to Word Weaving – A Word Craft Journal of Syllabic Verse appear in its first issue, The Moons of Autumn. A shadorma (Transition), an untitled haiku, and an untitled gogyohka appear with the work of many poets with whom I have become familiar, including Annette Rochelle Aben, Bill Engleson, Franci Hoffman (Eugenia), D. Wallace Peach, Kerfe Roig, Merril D. Smith, and Willow Willers.

My gogyohka also appears on the back cover as “Best of Issue Poem.”

The Moons of Autumn is available in paperback here and in digital form (Kindle) here. Many thanks to editors Colleen Chesebro and JulesPaige for placing my poetry among that of so many fine poets.

Ken G.

Anticipation ~ chōka & haiku

My initial reaction to Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 229 #SynonymsOnly, where the words offered are dawn and twilight (to be replaced with synonyms), was to write a haiku.

morning light
anticipated
with sunset

Instead, I decided to write a chōka.

Anticipation

morning lightsailboats at anchor
in the waning evening light
long day on the lake
lapping of waves against hulls
sound of buoys rings
air of anticipation
to feel wind in morning’s light

light of setting sun
brings a night of quiet rest
morning light arrives
waves ripple in reflection
as the cycle continues

Chōka, a Japanese long poem written primarily from the 6th to the 14th century. Chōka have alternating lines of 5 and 7 syllables and an indefinite length (from 7 to 149 lines), ending with an added 7 syllable line. So, 5-7-5-7-5-7-…7, and a length allowing greater themes.

Chōka often were followed by one or more short poems called hanka, or “envoys,” summarizing, supplementing, or elaborating on, the contents of the main poem. Sometimes, a tanka would serve as an envoy, and that is what I have written here.

Man’yōshū (“Collection of a Myriad Leaves”) is the oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry (from some time after AD 759) and contains 4,536 waka (classical Japanese poetry). 265 of those are chōka (long poems). The 1940/1965 edition of The Man’yōshū: One Thousand Poems (a translation) is available for download as a PDF from Internet Archive and is some pretty interesting reading.

Image: sunset on the Niagara River at Lake Ontario, Youngstown, New York
                              (click image for larger view in new tab)

with the years that have passed ~ gogyohka ~ ekphrastic poem

with the years that have passed

with the years that have passed
greater than those left to come
moments once frozen in time
blend one into another
as memories become a blur

This gogyohka is my response to Colleen Chesebro’s #Tanka Tuesday
Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 226 #Ekphrastic #Photoprompt
,
with the photo provided by Trent McDonald.

Gogyohka (pronounced go-gee-yoh-kuh)
~ a form of Japanese poetry pioneered by Enta Kusakabe in the 1950s
~ 5-line poetry ~ like tanka, but with freedom from restraints
~ no fixed syllable requirement
~ no conventions regarding content
~ brief lines in keeping with the tradition of Japanese short verse