The Only Way ~ ekphrastic haibun

The Only Way

This life, spent for so long in one place, was not a life spent at a standstill. The directions taken may not have been direct, but they’ve brought me to where I am, today. The shortest route is not always the quickest.

Knowing the streets in the towns around me like the back of my hand meant never getting lost while making deliveries when, and where, they were needed. There is a comfort in knowing a place so well, but other elements in life have a way of interceding.

So it happened, that my last time behind the wheel of a truck was on the direct, cross-country route that brought me here, following my heart to a new home.

falling leaf
taken by the wind
shifting scenes

This ekphrastic haibun is my response to Haibun Monday: Meet Piet,
from Kim at dVerse Poets Pub, with the prompt to write a haibun
inspired by “Broadway Boogie Woogie” by Piet Mondrian.

Image source: Wikimedia Commons – “Broadway Boogie Woogie”, by Piet Mondrian

Speaking of the Sea

Speaking of the Sea

Seasons have passed me by, and time moves on.
My wandering thoughts turn towards the sea,
sitting in delicate balance upon

the waves, like footprints on a sodden beach.
Fewer waves ahead, yet less time to rest,
so much left unsaid, this my final speech.

Mine is a ballad that’s best left unsung.
But if, by chance, my name crosses your lips,
may it be waves of praise that grace your tongue.

The challenge in Poetics: Three from the Welsh speaking sea, from Laura at dVerse Poets Pub is to write a poem using three of five end-rhyme word sets from Raymond Garlick’s Welsh-Speaking Sea. So, three (or more) rhyming tercets, with no meter required, but with the added challenge of using pentameter. No real meter here, but still 10-syllable lines. The word sets (with the option to reverse each word order):

speech / rest / beach
on / sea / upon
word / breath / bird
way / sound / bay
sung / lips / tongue

Image source: noaa.gov

The Final Peak ~ quadrille

The Final Peak

Was it really limitless, expansive
in its capacity to carry me forward?

Surmounting any obstacle,
daunting, then,
minuscule, now, looking back.

The final peak draws nearer, the end
closer, the time that fills this vessel
less, the further it climbs.

Some mountains are insurmountable.

This is my response to Quadrille #97: Filling the Page — the prompt from De Jackson
at dVerse, using the word fill in a 44-word poem that does not require meter or rhyme.

Image source: pixabay.com

Finding Direction ~ puente

Finding Direction

How I held your counsel dear,
missed now in your absence –
the talks we shared,
the lessons learned.
Long years have passed
since we last spoke,
each trial faced reminding me
of the advice you gave,
each time leading to
that never ending question.

~ Which is the right course to take? ~

No words I might provide
would hold the answer you seek.
It is not mine to give,
but yours to divine.
Look not to my past,
but to your present.
There is hope and despair
in all that you face.
Know the difference,
and all will be revealed.

The prompt for MTB: O Apostrophe! from Amaya at dVerse ~ Poets Pub is to use the poetic apostrophe – not as in possession, but in reference to something absent. When poets direct speech to an abstract concept or a person who is not physically present, they’re writing apostrophe poetry. Historically, poets often began their address to the absent party with the interjection “O.”

The is my first attempt at writing a puente. Its form seems perfect for my purposes, as this poem contains a response to the opening stanza.

The puente has three stanzas with the first and third having an equal number of lines and the middle stanza having only one line which acts as a bridge (puente) between the first and third stanza. The first and third stanzas convey a related but different element or feeling, as though they were two adjacent territories. The number of lines in the first and third stanza is the writer’s choice as is the choice of whether to write it in free verse or rhyme.

The center line is delineated by a tilde (~) and has ‘double duty’. It functions as the ending for the last line of the first stanza AND as the beginning for the first line of the third stanza. It shares ownership with these two lines and consequently bridges the first and third stanzas, essentially resulting in two that overlap.

A Thought Crystallizes

A Thought Crystallizes

In the moment it reflects,
still water tells you
all you need to know.

Clouds in a November sky
appear or do not, suggesting
snow or denying it.

The leaves are raked, but still
they fall, oaks paying no mind
to storm fronts or frozen ponds.

As you enter your winter,
know it may dictate conditions,
but need not dictate outcome.