When Will I See?

When Will I See?

Different, this distance
in time of sickness. Neighbor
more distant than new moon
beyond my reach.

Within sight again,
soon enough, will it taunt me
with its presence, my neighbor
still out of sight?

This is my second response to Poetics: Now I Can…, from Mish at dVerse PoetsPub.
She offers the haiga shown above, with a quote by Mizuta Masahide,
“Barn’s burnt down, now I can see the moon.”

The Obvious Truth ~ inspired by Disciple’s Dilemma (Tritina)

The Obvious Truth

It wasn’t till I looked
that I finally saw
the truism in your words.

For hidden in your words,
discovered when I looked,
there was a welcome saw.

Socially distant, I saw,
there within your words,
the answer, once I looked.

Overlooked, until I saw your words: I’ve got nothing but time.

If anyone can have fun with a poetry form it’s Ron. Lavalette, and, in so doing, offer further tritina inspiration.

Scrambled, Not Fried

No, it’s cool; I can wait.
I’ve got nothing but time…..
……………See?

As far as I can see
it’ll be worth the wait
(at least this time).

I mean, last time
I couldn’t get you to see;
but now…um…I can wait

No. It can’t wait. Time’s up!  See, dammit!!! See!!!

—————[|||]—————

My blogger friend Ken Gierke (rivrvlogr) introduced me to the TRITINA form, which uses repeated end words in three tercets as follows: ABC / CAB / BCA and a closing line that includes all 3: ABC.  You can read about the form at The Poets CollectiveHERE, and you can see Ken’s Tritina, The Color of Rain, HERE.

Thanks, Ken!

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The Color of Rain ~ tritina

The Color of Rain

Glad, the days when I hear
the colors in the sky
speaking through the rain,


their voices telling the rain,
“Listen closely and hear
the beauty of the sky.

Your own voice within the sky
is most welcome, rain,
joined with ours for all to hear.”

Glad too, the rain, to hear such welcome in the sky.

This is my response to Words and picture poetry challenge – 1, from Jane Dougherty, where she offers the Francis Ledwidge poem “Thomas McDonagh” with the challenge that we use three words from the poem as the end-of-line words in a tritina, with the Ledwidge poem as inspiration. (a variance, on my part, here)

Tritina ~ a poem with three three-line stanzas and a fourth stanza of one line
~ the same three end words used in the first three stanzas, in this order in                 successive stanzas: 1,2,3; 3,1,2; 2,3,1
~ the last, one-line stanza using the three words
“The repetition of words in a Tritina makes this form a good match for
a story that uses common speech, for in conversation the repetition of key words is common.” (poetscollective.org)
The three words used here are hear, sky and rain (1,2,3)

Also shared with Open Link Night #262, at dVerse Poets Pub.

Image source: freeimages.com / Michael Koralewski