Dreaming Trees – Kyrielle Sonnet

During Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #33: Dreaming Trees someone mentioned a poetry form different from her request for a kyrielle – the kyrielle sonnet, which has 3 quatrains using the same rhyme pattern, plus a non-rhyming couplet using the first and last lines.  I’ve modified my original kyrielle to be a kyrielle sonnet by removing the third verse, while still using all of the prompt words (moonlight, tread, wary, secret and sway) with a minor edit.
Image source: Art-Search.info (Moonlit Night, Highway by Isaac Illich Levitan)

Dreaming Trees

I make my way along the lane
Wondering if my thoughts are sane
Why choose this path so late at night
While birches sway in pale moonlight?

With fairy visions in my head
I pass this way, a wary tread
What secrets lie within the night
While birches sway in pale moonlight?

For does this dream, this mystery
Belong to me, or to the trees?
The truth, it seems, eludes my sight
While birches sway in pale moonlight

 I make my way along the lane
While birches sway in pale moonlight

Dreaming Trees

Dreaming Trees

 

I make my way along the lane
Wondering if my thoughts are sane
Why choose this path so late at night
While birches sway in pale moonlight?

With fairy visions in my head
I pass this way, a wary tread
As in a dream, I walk this night
While birches sway in pale moonlight

I fear that I may never know
What secrets lie in these shadows
When it would seem that all’s not right
While birches sway in pale moonlight

For does this dream, this mystery
Belong to me, or to the trees?
The truth, it seems, eludes my sight
While birches sway in pale moonlight

 

Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #33: Dreaming Trees provides a painting and an option to use any of these words: moonlight, tread, wary, secret and sway, as well as a request to write a kyrielle.  I’ve managed to meet all three parts of the challenge.
Kyrielle ~ a poem of at least 3 quatrains, with lines of 8 syllables and a rhyme pattern of                   aabB, ccbB, ddbB, etc.  The fourth line of the first stanza is used as the fourth line                   of each succeeding stanza
Image source: Art-Search.info (Moonlit Night, Highway by Isaac Illich Levitan)

Steadfast

Steadfast

choked, slaughtered,
near decimation,
resolute
nonetheless,
their true worth long neglected,
yet surviving, still

upon close
examination,
obvious
deception
of a natural order
becomes evident

on the move,
a forest of trees
cloaked in stealth
advances
beyond a faint horizon,
marching firmly on

 

This is my response to Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #17: Shadorma, using her suggested photo.
Shadorma ~ any number of stanzas, six lines each with a syllable progression of 3-5-3-3-7-5

Image credit: © Naturnet, via Wikipedia