no relief as sun rises ~ renga

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #102 Renga with Bashō … ancient times
asks us to create a renga (or chain of verses) by following
each provided haiku by Matsuo Bashō
(in blue), in any order, with two lines.
A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse)
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

still summer
the harvest moon too hot
to enjoy the coolness

no relief as sun rises
its warm light on garden path

chrysanthemum flowers
bloom at the stonemason’s
between stones

burst of color against gray
dimmed by clouds crossing the sky

morning glories
in the daytime a lock lowered
on the gate

will not keep out heavy rain
as it pools in the garden

flood waters
stars too will go to sleep
on top of a rock

wait for a stonemason’s dreams
to build them up before us

plum blossom scent
since ancient times the word
has been sorrowful

raising a glass to comrades
missing those lost in battle

warriors
the bitterness of pickles
in the talk

drinking wine in the garden
sour wine fitting for the mood

Images source: Harvard Art Museums
Pot Marigold and Rashumon Flowers, by Kubo Shunman

droplets in a moist blanket ~ renga

Carpe Diem Renga with Basho … still it sways asks us to create a renga
(or chain of verses) by following each provided haiku by Bashō
 with two lines.
(Bashō’s haiku here in blue italics – tr. Jane Reichhold)
A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse) 
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

mushrooms
not yet that many days
of autumn dew

droplets in a moist blanket
frost waiting to take its place

glistening dew
not spilling from bush clover
still it sways

damp leaves waving in light breeze
welcoming light of new day

morning glories
in the daytime a lock lowered
on the gate

opened now for daily walk
gardens empty of blossoms

chrysanthemum flowers
bloom at the stonemason’s
between stones

informal garden’s beauty
bright even in fading light

moon past full
the beginning of a little more
darkness

shorter days on forest path
coolness in the waning light

pine mushroom
with its ragged top it’s
like a pine tree

growing beneath a pine tree
gets little rain, but much dew

Images
Museum of Fine Arts Boston – Morning Glories at Iriya, by Utagawa Hiroshige
Museum of Fine Arts Boston – Bird and Chrysanthemums, by Utagawa Hiroshige
ukiyo-e.org – Wild Mushrooms, by Shibata Zeshin

its voice bringing welcome sleep ~ renga

Carpe Diem #1549 a pilllow of wind asks us to create a renga
(or chain of verses) by following each of the provided haiku of Bashō (here in blue italics)
with two lines. A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse) 
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

autumn has come
visiting my ear on
a pillow of wind

its voice bringing welcome sleep
soothing with a calm nature

asleep
the good-looking bush clover
has a flowery face

beauty like a memory
reminder of those long gone

autumn’s wind
mouth at the sliding door
a piercing voice

secrets told in a whisper
ancestor speaking to me

that handsome man
clearly is no longer living
a rain-hidden moon

wordless secrets shed no light
their truth remaining hidden

is it a spider
with a voice crying
the autumn wind

beads of water like teardrops
hidden in a tangled web

end of the month
no moon hugging an ancient cedar
in the storm

seeking comfort in the night
wind its only company

Images
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Butterflies and Bush Clover, by Utagawa Hiroshige
ukiyo-e.org
Sengaku Temple, by Tsuchiya Koitsu
ukiyo-e.org
Pine Trees, by Odake Chikuha

sunlight bringing it to life ~ renga

Carpe Diem #1547 Renga With … big five haiku poets asks us to create a renga
(or chain of verses) by following the provided haiku of various haijin (here in blue italics)
with two lines. A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse) 
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

it is seen
in the papier-maché cat
the morning of autumn
Basho

sunlight bringing it to life
mouse on the shelf runs away

with the autumn tempest
the small drum
falls from its shelf
Shiki

no one there to see it fall
traveling alone this day

when I go out of the gate
I also am a traveller
in the autumn evening
Buson

on the road to far places
seeing everyone, no one

along this road
goes no one
this autumn eve
Basho

darkness will not change my path
silver light in parting clouds

autumn’s bright moon
however far I walked, still afar off
in an unknown sky
Chiyo-Ni

longing to be in my home
now closer to my village

two houses!
two houses making rice-cakes:
autumn rain
Issa

will return favor of meal
with happiness at sunrise

Images
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Woman and Two Children with Cat and Pet Mouse, by Suzuki Harunobu
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Young Man with Umbrella beside a Fence, by Suzuki Harunobu
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Moon at Magome, by Kawase Hasui
Library of Congress
Two Mice with Rice Cakes, by Katsushika Hokusai

nightfall’s sultry seduction ~ renga

nightfall's sultry seduction

evening comes
wrapped in sea fog
tied with webs
               Jane Reichhold

nightfall’s sultry seduction
fingers weaving in and out

evening sea fog
descending into sun-dried grass
sweaty lovers
               Jane Reichhold

sensual embrace of shore
in soft lingering caress

The prompt for Carpe Diem #1541 Evening is to create a renga
by responding to two haiku by Jane Reichhold.

following long winding path ~ renga

Carpe Diem #1532 Richard Wright’s “A Red Sinking Autumn Sun” asks us to create a renga
(or chain of verses) by following the provided haiku by Richard Wright (here in blue italics)
with two lines. A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse) 
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

following long winding path_1One magnolia
Landed upon another
In the dew-wet grass.

following long winding path
to village in the valley

Keep straight down this block,
Then turn right where you will find
A peach tree blooming.

sound of bees seeking pollen
scented shower of petals

following long winding path_2

Make up your mind, Snail!
You are half inside your house,
And halfway out!

neighbor waving from window
one more mile to reach my home

All right, You Sparrows;
The sun has set and you can now
Stop your chattering!

longing for peace and quiet
weary from days of travel

You moths must leave now;
I am turning out the light
And going to sleep.

open window calls to you
leaving my mind free to dream

following long winding path_3I am nobody:
A red sinking autumn sun
Took my name away.

left behind along the way
enlightenment in new day

Images
Museum of Fine Arts Boston – Java Sparrow on Magnolia, by Katsushika Hokusai
Library of Congress – Snail and Magnolia, by Utagawa Hiroshige
The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Moths and Butterflies, by Kubo Shunman (edited here)

(I buried this on my hard drive and missed the submission window at Carpe Diem)

blending darkness into rice ~ renga

Carpe Diem #1547 Renga With … big five haiku poets asks us to create a renga
(or chain of verses) by following the provided haiku of various haijin (here in blue italics)
with two lines. A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse) 
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

pressing sushi;
after a while,
a feeling of loneliness
                    Buson

blending rice into darkness
no lights on in empty home

at the gate of a deserted house,
a cicada is crying in the rays
of the evening sun
                    Shiki

call recedes like fading light
days pass like flowing water

all my years
floating in the river
a childish heart
                    Jane Reichhold

keeping faith in my travels
memories always return

the coolness
of the sound of water at night,
falling back into the well
                    Issa

like light consuming shadows
a wealth of experience

a flash of lightning:
the screech of a night-heron
flying in the darkness
                    Basho

clouds parted by beating wings
bringing light into the night

autumn’s bright moon,
however far I walked, still afar off
in an unknown sky
                    Chiyo-Ni

like a distant companion
never near enough to touch

Images
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Woman and Two Children with Cat and Pet Mouse, by Suzuki Harunobu
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Young Man with Umbrella beside a Fence, by Suzuki Harunobu
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Moon at Magome, by Kawase Hasui