Reflecting on Darkness ~ Reboot

It has come to my attention that my “prosery” posted on August 4th was flawed, in that my copy/paste into the editor resulted in the first paragraph being eliminated, while the second paragraph was duplicated.  Here is Reflecting on Darkness, as I wrote it.
Ken G.

Reflecting on Darkness

Within surrounding darkness, yet awake in the light of a near-yet-distant star, I gaze at a blue marble far beyond my reach. My loneliness tells me that I am the only one who appreciates the beauty it holds. Who else can there be? Is there any face beyond my own that has gazed outward?

And what of that darkness? Should I let it consume me? The light I cast may be a faint reflection, but it is here, always, the only shadows falling beneath the measured steps of men long gone, or cast by the occasional passing of that globe of beauty amid the darkness.

Perhaps that orb gazes towards me, the same questions crossing its mind as it ponders the darkness that surrounds us. Can there be more to this world, or that, than meets the eye?

I dreamt I was the moon.

Prosery is a form devised at dVerse, and the challenge is to write a piece of flash fiction with a 144-word limit. Included in the bit of prose is to be a complete line from a poem. With Prosery #2, the line to be included was “I dreamt I was the moon” from Alice Oswald’s “Full Moon.”

Image source: ©NASA (Earthrise)

Reflecting on Darkness

Reflecting on Darkness as it appears below is flawed – note the duplication of paragraph #2 in paragraph #1.  I have corrected that with Reflecting on Darkness ~ Reboot, but I am leaving this version here as a reminder to myself to pay closer attention when using the editor.      …      Ken G.

Reflecting on Darkness

And what of that darkness? Should I let it consume me? The light I cast may be a faint reflection, but it is here, always, the only shadows falling beneath the measured steps of men long gone, or cast by the occasional passing of that globe of beauty amid the darkness.

And what of that darkness? Should I let it consume me? The light I cast may be a faint reflection, but it is here, always, the only shadows falling beneath the measured steps of men long gone, or cast by the occasional passing of that globe of beauty amid the darkness.

Perhaps that orb gazes towards me, the same questions crossing its mind as it ponders the darkness that surrounds us. Can there be more to this world, or that, than meets the eye?

I dreamt I was the moon.

I used that line, “I dreamt I was the moon,” in my last post always early morning, a magnetic poem. I was away for a week, returning the evening of July 22nd, and apparently glanced at the dVerse prompt (now closed) before setting aside writing to work on another project for a few days. When I found the line in my notes, I assumed it was for a poem and went from there. I’m glad that Jane and Merril reminded me about the original prompt (now closed).

This bit of flash fiction is my response to Prosery #2, presented by Sarah at dVerse. With Prosery, the challenge is to write a piece of flash fiction with a 144-word limit. Included in the bit of prose is to be a complete line from a poem. For Prosery #2, the line to be included is “I dreamt I was the moon” from Alice Oswald’s “Full Moon.” My flash fiction also meets the additional challenge of hitting the 144-word mark, exactly.

Image source: ©NASA (Earthrise)

Ken G.

full moon approaching ~ haiku

full moon approaching
visible on longest night
day of transition

This haiku is in response to
Frank Tassone’s #Haikai Challenge #65: Solstice II.

Image: the moon at 4:34pm CST 21 December 2018
~ sunset was at 4:50pm ~
(The Missouri State Capitol is under wraps for a $50M renovation)

 

The moon at 6:29pm and 6:37pm CST 21 December 2018
~ full moon is at 11:48am 22 Dec 2018 ~
(click each image for larger view in new tab)

Flames Dance in the Night ~ haibun

Flames Dance in the Night

Sitting around the open fire, talking about the day now gone and watching the horizon pass from twilight to a dark expanse blending into the glorious band of stars that is the Milky Way. That was one of the rewards of the visits to my parents’ home in the country. Of course, during winter months those evening talks were indoors, the heat radiating from the wood stove slowly seeping into our bones after a day spent out on the snow. But the rest of the year there were those nights spent around the fire, its flames holding back the evening chill, sometimes past midnight.

flames dance in the night
sparks rise, dim against the stars
moon clearing the ridge

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #60 The Quest for a New Masterpiece goes on … journey
asks us to write a haibun focusing on a journey we have made.

Image source: unsplash.com / by Felix Mittermeier

sunlight bringing it to life ~ renga

Carpe Diem #1547 Renga With … big five haiku poets asks us to create a renga
(or chain of verses) by following the provided haiku of various haijin (here in blue italics)
with two lines. A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse) 
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

it is seen
in the papier-maché cat
the morning of autumn
Basho

sunlight bringing it to life
mouse on the shelf runs away

with the autumn tempest
the small drum
falls from its shelf
Shiki

no one there to see it fall
traveling alone this day

when I go out of the gate
I also am a traveller
in the autumn evening
Buson

on the road to far places
seeing everyone, no one

along this road
goes no one
this autumn eve
Basho

darkness will not change my path
silver light in parting clouds

autumn’s bright moon
however far I walked, still afar off
in an unknown sky
Chiyo-Ni

longing to be in my home
now closer to my village

two houses!
two houses making rice-cakes:
autumn rain
Issa

will return favor of meal
with happiness at sunrise

Images
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Woman and Two Children with Cat and Pet Mouse, by Suzuki Harunobu
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Young Man with Umbrella beside a Fence, by Suzuki Harunobu
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Moon at Magome, by Kawase Hasui
Library of Congress
Two Mice with Rice Cakes, by Katsushika Hokusai