Leaves in the Wind ~ haibun

 

Leaves in the Wind

Leaves whisper among themselves, giving voice to the breeze that caresses them. They may speak of birth and the vitality they hold for just one season. Perhaps they speak of the fall dance that awaits them, when they dress in festive colors that shout to the world their exuberance even in their decline. They may move in unison, turn this way and that, shifting shades of green early on or shimmering in the subtle translucence of their late-in-life display, but once they lose their grasp it is the wind that determines their direction.

fallen leaves
rustle in the wind
chipmunks nest

This haibun is another take on the prompt at dVerse ~ Poets Pub,
Haibun Monday: aki no koe (Autumn’s Voice).
I’m sharing it with OpenLinkNight #327 at dVerse.

My first response is here.

Cloud of Fallen Leaves ~ haibun

Cloud of Fallen Leaves

Four hours of raking leaves into piles and another six hours of raking from the piles onto a tarp to be dragged to my compost pile in the corner of my yard means two days of yardwork, every year. Last year, I decided this old body needed some sort of relief, so I bought a gas-powered leaf blower. At twenty pounds, the backpack is not uncomfortable, and the leaves are blown into piles within ninety minutes. It may be a timesaver, but it still takes two days to move those leaves. I’ll be happy when they can finally be teleported.

cloud of fallen leaves
moves at high velocity
chipmunks on the run

This is my response to Haibun Monday: aki no koe (Autumn’s Voice),
the prompt from Linda Lee Lyburg at dVerse ~ Poets Pub.

The top image is my leaf pile, which fills to the top every year

This is just one quarter of my leaves
(And yes, chipmunks scattered from one pile as I started to rake it onto a tarp)

Ashes in the Air ~ haibun

Ashes in the Air

Our county has an open burn season for brush, etc., that runs from the first of November through the first of March, provided high winds are not a factor. Our city does, as well, and resident are encouraged to be considerate of neighbors. In fact, they are encouraged to take broken tree limbs, leaves and brush to the city’s yard waste site where mulch is made available to residents. Why burning is allowed in the city, where up to five houses may be within an acre of land, is beyond me. Even the slightest breeze will carry smoke hundreds of feet. With the mild winters and temperature fluctuations that we have, it’s not unusual to have an occasional fifty to seventy degree day with open windows as an open invitation for that smoke.

smoke slowly rises
as dry leaves and branches burn
ashes in the air

This haibun is my response to Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt
#Challenge 391 BURN(ed/ing/s) and Old.

Image source: 11alive.com

Welcome Transition ~ haibun

Welcome Transition

Welcome Transition

Maple, so distinctive in this land of oak, hickory and cedar, calls to me, reminds me of the forests I knew, with their vivid colors in the cool days of autumn. The muted red, yellow and brown of Missouri cannot compare to the brilliant orange and red of Western New York.

cycle continues
with transformation of leaves
welcome transition

Carpe Diem #1527 Rustling Leaves (extreme haibun) asks for a haibun
of 60 words or less on the theme of “leaves.”