photos on laptop ~ haiku

 

photos on laptop
showing newlyweds posing
beneath oak’s new leaves

The prompt for Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation # 86 – Carpe Diem’s Utopia is to write a modern Utopian (excellent) haiku, while using classical rules. Those rules are listed below, to show how this haiku, while having a modern theme, is able to meet the rules for a classic haiku.

     • Syllable count of 5-7-5
     • Inspiration source – (short moment in time) – here, that pose, with its significance
     • Season word(kigo) – here, it is “new leaves,” indicating spring
     • Interchanging – the first and third lines interchangeable without losing the imagery of the haiku

 

seeing potential ~ haiku

even an old man
has New Year’s eyes…
cherry blossoms
Issa

seeing potential
in arrival of new year
even in old age

The prompt for Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #85 Photo-shopping haiku – cherry blossoms is to “photo-shop” or remake a haiku by Kobayashi Issa (above in blue), by making a minor edit. I had a hard time stopping at “minor.”

Image source: Minneapolis Institute of Arts – Old Man Who Made Blossoms Bloom, by Sonsai Kōitsu

 

willow on stream bank ~ haiku

The prompt for Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #84 Quest for a New Masterpiece … Movement (Undou) asks us to create a new haiku using movement (or undou), inspired by Bashō’s “frog pond” haiku (tr. Jane Reichhold, below in blue).

old pond
a frog jumps into
the sound of water
               Bashō

willow on stream bank
long leaves trailing on water
knows little of thirst

Image: Niagara River Gorge at Whirlpool State Park, New York

heron spied on shore ~ haiku video

heron spied on shore
silver flash in bill, then gone
river rushes by

This haiku is in response to the prompt for NaPoWriMo.net Day 23, which is to write a poem about an animal.

Image: Great Blue Heron in the Niagara River Gorge, 09 September 2008
(click image for larger view in new tab)

The camera I used for the photo was a small Canon. It also took video, and I actually captured the heron catching a fish. I had been using the camera to upload to YouTube for two years. The video was a small format (320×240) and it was in flash video, so that was the format I uploaded. I found that file today and used a clip to create an mp4 video in 640×480 (thus a slight blurriness) for this video poem.