My Video Poem Appears on BCTV

My Video Poem Appears on BCTV

My video poem, “transmission remission,” is featured in the NAP Connection presentation of Spirits of Isolation – January to June 2020, an international exhibition of artwork produced during the Coronavirus Pandemic which was broadcast on 24 June 2020 on BCTV. Mine is the only poem presented and appears at 19:52 of the program, which is 55 minutes in length, but I am just one of the 90 artists featured.

Artists were asked to show how they were surviving during the COVID-19 pandemic through art created from January to June 2020. Hundreds of works of art are seen in the presentation, which includes paintings, sculptures, multimedia art, and photography, with some of the art associated with the lock down and isolation.

My thanks go to Organizers Ron Schira and Lisa Foster for including my poem in this presentation.

NAP Connection is a production of the New Arts Program, Kutztown, Pennsylvania.

BCTV (Berks Community Television) is a public access cable provider in Berks County (Reading), Pennsylvania.

Another Fine Fix ~ quadrille

Another Fine Fix

What can fix this fouled up fix
we sadly find ourselves in?

Could it be a time to be
thankful that we’re trapped within?

Considering that everything
that’s out there is a danger,

the safest place, in any case,
is far away from strangers.

This is my response to Quadrille #104: Oh, We’re in a Fix!
the prompt from De Jackson at dVersePoets Pub, which is to use the word fix
in a 44-word poem, with no required meter or rhyme.

Image source: Wikimedia Commons (Harold Lloyd in Safety Last!)

Don’t Forget To… ~ quadrille

Don’t Forget To…

Flush this memory from your mind,
this bomb shelter moment
when anyone at your door could be
a threat, the very air you breathe
the one thing you may not want
to breathe but must, when toilet paper
is the measure of your wealth.

This is my response to Quadrille #102: Don’t Forget To…
the prompt from Mish at dVerse, which is to use the word flush
in a 44-word poem, with no required meter or rhyme.

Image source: netclipart.com

Another Tricky Day

Another Tricky Day

What is one day to another?

Does Monday wish for Friday,
Wednesday give thanks that it’s not Monday?

And would the sun still rise
if Sunday fell in the middle of the week?

These questions were answered long ago,
when I retired and every day became Friday.

But what of those now sitting at home,
stay-at-home and social distancing their jailers.

Will they return to their daily regimen
now that every day is Saturday?

The prompt for Day 18 at napowrimo.net is to write an ode to life’s small pleasures.

a palpable absence ~ hay(na)ku

a palpable absence

finding nearly empty shelves inside
a store with a clerk outside
counting customers as they enter
to find themselves nearly alone, leaving
half-satisfied to pass empty buildings,
cars less frequent than the few pedestrians,
to arrive home, present in my absence

Today is Day 10 of National/Global Poetry Writing Month, and the prompt for
The Perfect Seven Lines, from Frank at dVerse Poets Pub
is simply to write a seven-line poem.

The prompt for napowrimo.net is to write a hay(na)ku – a variant on the haiku,
with a three-line stanza of one, two, and three words, sometimes chained
to create a longer poem – so I have edited this to create a hay(na)ku.

a palpable absence

clerk
counting customers
entering the store

surprised
to find
I’m almost alone

frustration
on finding
nearly empty shelves

leaving
half-satisfied
to drive home

passing
empty buildings
on empty streets

finally
arriving home
present in absence

Image source: artoflivingguide.org

No Way

No Way

We walk in place,
pace a fiction we place
upon ourselves. No collective
intended here, intentions
of isolation our recourse
when we have everywhere to go
and nowhere to accept us,
except as carriers of contagion,
contained out of necessity.

This poem is inspired by (Poet Girl Em) Emily’s Way.
Although she has been posting less often, Em always provides thought provoking poetry.

As one of the last states to do so, Missouri’s governor finally issued a statewide stay-at-home order, yesterday. Our city and county have been “stay-at-home” for more than a week, with “limited gatherings” in place before that. The governor had hesitated to issue a statewide order, instead relying on localities to better gauge the needs of their communities. An example of how well that was working could be found around Lake of the Ozarks, a resort area in mid-Missouri, where cities waited until 4 days ago to limit gatherings to no more than 10 people.

Today is Day 4 of National/Global Poetry Writing Month.
While this poem is off-prompt, but I’m sharing it at
napowrimo.net.

Image source: morguefile.com

Fresh Air Walk During a Pandemic

Fresh Air Walk During a Pandemic

There was rain that would not touch me,
followed by sunlight that surrounded me
but kept a respectful distance.

Even pollen seemed deferential.
Skirting the edge of the trail,
passing hikers offered a simple hello.

The birds treated it like any other day,
their distance a product of instinct,
mine a matter of discretion.

Cedar branches swayed in the breeze,
flinging leftover rain droplets,
a reminder that things could be normal again.

This is my poem for Day 2 of National/Global Poetry Writing Month.
It’s off-prompt, but I’m sharing it at
napowrimo.net.

Also shared with Open Link Night #263 at dVerse Poets Pub.

When Will I See?

When Will I See?

Different, this distance
in time of sickness. Neighbor
more distant than new moon
beyond my reach.

Within sight again,
soon enough, will it taunt me
with its presence, my neighbor
still out of sight?

This is my second response to Poetics: Now I Can…, from Mish at dVerse PoetsPub.
She offers the haiga shown above, with a quote by Mizuta Masahide,
“Barn’s burnt down, now I can see the moon.”