polishing cedar ~ fusion troiku

The prompt for Carpe Diem #1789 The Winter Trees (Crossroads)
starts with two haiku by Yosa Buson (
in blue) to be used
to create a “fusion” haiku which is then to be the base for a troiku.

cutting into with the ax,
I was surprised at the scent.
the winter trees.

unfolding at the
hand of the glass polisher:
a camellia!

               Yosa Buson

polishing cedar
beauty of the grain unfolds
stimulating scents

polishing cedar
respecting treasured heirloom
held in loving hands

beauty of the grain unfolds
revealing further treasures
beloved keepsakes

stimulating scents
reminders of days long gone
held close to the heart

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Image source: wikimedia.org (troika)

walking through wet grass ~ fusion troiku

This response to Carpe Diem #1784 soaking wet (Crossroads)
is past the acceptance window, but here it is, anyway. The challenge is to use two  haiku
by Santōka Taneda (
in blue) to be used to create a “fusion” haiku,
which then is to be the base to create a troiku.

soaking wet
I can’t read the letters
on the signpost

walking through
the bush clover, the pampas grass,
walking on through them
               © Santōka Taneda
~~~~~~~

walking through wet grass
glistening beneath the sun
sign of morning rain

walking through wet grass
in early light’s rising mist
wishing for dry shoes

glistening beneath the sun
reflections like pearls of light
hanging from grass blades

sign of morning rain
erased by touch of mild breeze
sun melting the clouds

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Image sources:
wallpapersafari.com
wikimedia.org (troika)

the snow of yesterday ~ troiku

Carpe Diem #1691 Troiku Month – The Snow of Yesterday offers
a haiku by Gozan (
in blue) to be used to create a troiku.
~~~~
The haiku by Gozan was written late in life.
A tradition among Zen monks was to write a last haiku,
a jisei or “death haiku,” showing the circle of life.

the snow of yesterday
that fell like cherry blossoms
is water once again
               Gozan

~~~~~~~

the snow of yesterday
does not survive the seasons
memories fading

that fell like cherry blossoms
taking all color with them
no longer falling

is water once again
blurring traces of the past
until all is gone

The haiku by Gozan was written late in life.
A tradition among Zen monks was to write a last haiku,
a jisei or “death haiku,” showing the circle of life.

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Images
desktopnexus.com (cherry blossoms)
Wikimedia Commons (troika)

to listen ~ troiku

to listen,
fine not to listen, fine too…
nightingale
               Chiyo-Ni

~~~~~~~

to listen,
accept the sounds around you
try to understand

fine not to listen, fine too…
being a part of that world
accepting each voice

nightingale
singing for all who listen
knowing when to sing

I try to finish a troiku in one sitting, but it can be time consuming. I set this one aside, so it was not finished before the prompt window closed. The original haiku (in blue) by Chiyo-Ni was provided last week in Carpe Diem #1686 Troiku Month – Nightingale.

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Images
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Roses and Bamboo with Nightingale, by Teisai Hokuba
Wikimedia Commons (troika)

oasis of green ~ troiku

The prompt for Carpe Diem #1690 Troiku Month – butterfly is to write a haiku
about butterflies (
in blue) to be used to create a troiku.

oasis of green
butterflies inside glass house
aerial antics

~~~~~~~

oasis of green
providing year-round delight
with elegant flight

butterflies inside glass house
graced with exotic colors
bright tropical plants

aerial antics
Lepidoptera ballet
on delicate wings

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Images
Butterfly photo taken at St. Louis Butterfly House
and edited with Prisma (click for larger view in new tab)
Wikimedia Commons (troika)

alone on the beach ~ troiku

Carpe Diem #1688 Troiku Month – Breathing Silence offers
a haiku by Chèvrefeuille (
in blue) to be used to create a troiku.

alone on the beach
only the cries of seagulls –
breathing silence
               © Chèvrefeuille

~~~~~~~

alone on the beach
one wave joined by another
sunlight on the sand

only the cries of seagulls
as they reel above my head
shadows touching me

breathing silence
flowing between each moment
like waves on the shore

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Images
Image source: Wikimedia Commons
(Seagulls over the Waves, by Watanabe Shōtei)
Wikimedia Commons (troika)

hours before sunrise ~ fusion troiku ~ hineri

The prompt for Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #90 Crossroads
Summer Solstice (Troiku Hineri)

starts with two haiku by Jane Reichhold and Yosa Buson (
in blue) to be used
to create a “fusion” haiku which is then to be the base for a troiku.
The hineri (or twist) is to use each of those haiku to create three new troiku.

this short night –
from a shallow well I scoop
a persimmon flower
                      Yosa Buson

solstice splits
between the peach halves
a red stone sun
                      © Jane Reichhold

~~~~~~~

hours before sunrise
a shallow well of darkness
summer solstice night

hours before sunrise
early morning dew on grass
field mouse in hiding

a shallow well of darkness
offers little time to hunt
owl returns to nest

summer solstice night
shadows fading into light
eyes closing at dawn

The three additional troiku follow, below.

hours before sunrise
tiny feet finding way home
safety of darkness

early morning dew on grass
faint signs of activity
traveler’s footprints

field mouse in hiding
snugly secure in its nest
before coming light

a shallow well of darkness
holding opportunity
for keen eyed hunter

offers little time to hunt
darkness giving way to light
before finding prey

owl returns to nest
spending the day in silence
patiently waiting

summer solstice night
approaches with setting sun
wings spread in darkness

shadows fading into light
successful night of hunting
hunger satisfied

eyes closing at dawn
owl hidden within shadows
waiting for nightfall

A troiku is three haiku, with each of the three lines from a suggested haiku as the first line of each haiku in the troiku. It’s not always possible to have a 5-7-5 format in the second haiku, due to the limitations of the suggested haiku. The name of the form is derived from “troika,” a sled or carriage drawn by three horses harnessed side-by-side, an iconic symbol of Imperial Russia.

Troika

Image sources:
Library of Congress
Bullfinch and Horned Owl, by Kitagawa Utamoro (cropped here)
wikimedia.org (troika)