kinship

kinship

one room
three poets
convergence
a matter of perspective
all compass points relative to center
that sweet rose
friendship

gogyohka

three poets in one room
convergence
a matter of perspective
all compass points relative to center
sweet rose of friendship

shadorma

three poets
compass points gathered
convergence
perspective
all relative to center
sweet rose of friendship

cherita

three poets

convergence
a matter of perspective

compass points
relative to center
sweet rose, friendship

lune

three poets
that sweet rose, friendship
convergence

Our trip to Cleveland/Buffalo took us through Indianapolis, where we spent a pleasant evening with Stephanie L. Harper and Robert Okaji.

Yeah, short-form poetry is my thing.  I decided to try writing the first free-verse poem in other forms.  The definitions of these forms can be found on my Poetic Forms page.

Image source: peakpx.com

Sevenling (the journey)

Sevenling (the journey)

The journey is never over.
Never complete.
Always open to interpretation.

Destination, always changing,
a matter of conjecture.
Beginning and end have no significance.

The return is just a stop along the way.

I have been inspired by Ron. Lavalette, the master of the sevenling, to write my first.

Sevenling ~ created by Roddy Lumsden, a Scottish poet
~ a seven-line poem composed of three stanzas
~ first stanza ~ three connected or contrasting statements, or a list of three details, names or possibilities. (all of the three lines ~ or ~ contained anywhere within them)
~ second stanza ~ similarly contains an element of three, connected directly or indirectly or not at all to the preceding stanza (again, anywhere within the three lines)
~third stanza ~ a single line that should should act as a narrative summary or punchline or as an unusual juxtaposition
~ the tone should be mysterious, offbeat or disturbing, as if only a fragment of the story has been told
~ title is optional ~ if used, then “Sevenling (first few words)”

Image source: pngegg.com

Poetry

Poetry

Poetrythe poet
unabashedly
announces
each moment
is worthy of a poem
each is a poem

with
each
new word
a poem
will take the reader
deeper into its relevance
broadening the experience
until the reader
understands
those thoughts
are
true

My response to Day 7 of napowrimo.net, which asks us to write either a shadorma or a Fib, contains both.

The Fib is a poetic form created by Gregory K. Pincus that plays off the mathematical Fibonacci sequence to arrive at the syllable count per line. For a 6-line poem, that count would be 1/1/2/3/5/8. Each count is determined by adding the 2 previous line-counts. A multi-stanza poem can be written by linking multiple Fibs together. Mine was created by reversing the syllable count in the second half – 8/5/3/2/1/1.

A shadorma has one or more 6-line stanza(s) with a syllable count of 3/5/3/3/7/5. I posted a shadorma for each day of the month during November 2017.

~ Day 7 ~

Image source: Wikipedia