waiting for a break in clouds ~ tan renga

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Wednesday – White Crane asks us to use
a haiku by Kikaku (in blue) to create a tanka.

how I wish to call
a white crane from Fukei,
but for this cold rain.
               Kikaku

waiting for a break in clouds
to deliver good fortune

A crane is said to symbolize good fortune, balance, and happiness.
Image source: ukiyo-e.org – Crane and Waves, by Baiso
(right click image for larger view in new tab)

the first of many brushstrokes ~ soliloquy no renga

one starry night
to make that one painting –
the rustling leaves
© Chèvrefeuille

branches sway in gentle breeze
starlight twinkling in their wake

stargazing poet
would be stargazing painter
inspired by the night

nature’s canvas in the sky
with myriad points of light

brilliant distraction
moon rising above the trees
such inspiration

leaves dancing before the moon
silhouetted by its light

framed by counterpoints
lights much closer than the stars
planets in the night

shifting shades of red and blue
sparkling in a star filled sky

so much to choose from
all these heavenly bodies
wonder where to start

shooting star in star filled sky
the first of many brushstrokes

Carpe Diem Weekend Meditation #107 Soliloquy no Renga … one starry night offers a haiku by Chèvrefeuille (in blue) to be followed by subsequent links of a renga by the responding poet, with a minimum of six links. A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse) and ageku (closing verse) connect in a way to make “the circle” complete.
This is my response.

Photos: Hunter’s Moon, 13 October 2019
Star image: The Galaxy Above, © Rodrigo Guerra, via Astronomy Picture of the Day

dancing on the beach ~ renga

Carpe Diem #1697 Renga with Jane Reichhold … placing the flute
asks us to create a renga (or chain of verses) by following
each provided haiku by Jane Reichhold
(in blue), in any order, with two lines.
A “closed chain” is attained when the hokku (starting verse)
and ageku (closing verse)
connect in a way to make “the circlecomplete.

dancing on the beach
I jab a stick into the sky
to break up the blue

sun giving way to shadow
welcome relief of evening

days so complete
words become the calls of birds
the high tide wind

carries the scent of sea foam
mingling with all most pleasant

wind perfumed
from a woman’s shoulder
desert night

carried across the mountains
like a song riding the breeze

placing the flute
against her lips something
slips into place

a tune that piques the senses
with charms that arouse desire

moon white water
lovers in the secret cove
Saturday night

long hours gazing at the stars
wisdom reaching through the years

I’m not old
all night my eyes have held
the ancient stars

until deep dark of night sky
yields to light of morning’s blue

Images source: pexels.com / Dominika Roseclay

so little light to be found ~ tan renga

Carpe Diem #1669 Tan Renga – white crane asks us to use a haiku by Kikaku (in blue) – written to comfort Basho shortly before his death – to be used to create a tanka.

How I wish to call
A white crane from Fukei
But for this cold rain

               Kikaku

so little light to be found
when under such a dark cloud

Image source: Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Crane Flying over Wave, by Utagawa Hiroshige

leading away from the shore ~ tan renga

grass on river bank.jpg

late summer
alone on the beach
with only tracks
               © Jane Reichhold

leading away from the shore
to unknown destination

journey continues
following unknown footsteps
with new direction

traveler seeking answers
absent for many seasons

beyond falling leaves
lessons learned in falling snow
blossoms come and go

wind whispers in drying grass
all revealed on reaching home

The challenge for Carpe Diem #1664 Tan Renga Hineri “only tracks” is one with a twist (hineri). A haiku by Jane Reichhold (in blue) is to be followed by two lines, as usual. These must be followed by another haiku, and then another two lines – with the optional challenge of adding another haiku and two lines. In effect, it’s almost a solo renga, except for the first haiku by Jane Reichhold. As with renga, the last stanza (ageku) should lead back to the first (hokku).

Image source: Wikimedia Commons
(Wind Blown Grass Across the Moon, by Utagawa Hiroshige)