Like Pebbles on the Sand

Like Pebbles on the Sand

On the shore of possibility
Each a pebble, worn smooth by the years
Humanity gazed upon that sea
Longing for a future free from tears

Each a pebble, worn smooth by the years
No two the same, in shape, shade or hue
Longing for a future free from tears
Each grain and texture shining on through

No two the same, in shape, shade or hue
Reflecting on a future of peace
Each grain and texture shining on through
Ending conflict, when all war would cease

Reflecting on a future of peace
With all sadness and blues swept aside
Ending conflict, when all war would cease
Peacefully existing, side by side

With all sadness and blues swept aside
Humanity gazed upon that sea
Peacefully existing, side by side
On the shore of possibility

 

This is my reply to Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #35: Pebbles, write a pantoum, using her photo and these suggested words: bright, smooth, shore, blue and reflecting. (Here, shining is used for bright.)
Pantoum ~  a series of quatrains, with the second and fourth lines of each stanza repeated as the first and third lines of the next stanza.  In addition, the first and third lines of the first stanza reappear as the fourth and second lines of the last stanza.  Where possible, ideas of repeating lines shift (via punctuation, etc.).

Falling Leaves

last dance

Slowly drifting, turning round
Riding on the faintest breeze
Floating past without a sound
Omen of a coming freeze

Riding on the faintest breeze
Vibrant hues of red and gold
Omen of a coming freeze
Season’s passing here foretold

Vibrant hues of red and gold
Gentle, still, upon a stream
Seasons passing, here foretold
A vessel now, so it would seem

Gentle, still upon a stream
Floating past without a sound
A vessel now, so it would seem
Slowly drifting, turning round

 

This is my reply to Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #21: Pantoum.
Pantoum ~  a series of quatrains, with the second and fourth lines of each stanza repeated as the first and third lines of the next stanza.  In addition, the first and third lines of the first stanza reappear as the fourth and second lines of the last stanza.  Where possible, ideas of repeating lines shift (via punctuation, etc.).

Image: Sycamore leaf on a Missouri stream