As the Pale Moon Rises

The Dark of December

As the Pale Moon Rises

An autumn night, and the pale moon rises.
My mind goes back as the pale moon rises,

To a man in the autumn of his life,
In autumn days as the pale moon rises.

With talk of work that’s done and left to do.
A day well spent as the pale moon rises.

Having no regrets, taking stock of life
And what’s in store as the pale moon rises.

In quiet moments under the stars,
Stirring embers as the pale moon rises.

Seasons, people, and places fade away.
I miss those talks as the pale moon rises.

There are lessons held in these memories,
If I may ken, when the pale moon rises.

My father retired early due to health issues. As I wrote this ghazal for the dVerse prompt, my thoughts turned to him and time spent with my parents in the Eighties, during weekend visits to their home in the country.
Ghazal ~ five or more couplets, lines the same length, meter not required
~ first couplet same end words; 1 to 3 words in 2nd lines repeated; rhyme – aA bA cA dA eA
~ (optional) internal rhyme in second lines, preceding repeated rhyme
~ possible naming or reference to author in last couplet
~ traditionally invoking melancholy, love, longing, and metaphysical questions, ghazals are often sung by Iranian, Indian, and Pakistani musicians

A Touch of Green

A Touch of Green

A Touch of Green

Winter meant bare branches along this stream.
At last, the trees are green along this stream.

And with it, the entire scene seems to come
to life as I slowly paddle downstream.

Swallows dash about for food, their hatchlings
in the nests that line the banks of the stream.

Brown squirrels gambol along maple branches,
hanging perilously above the stream.

Heron stares keenly into the water,
waiting patiently for fish in the stream.

A pair of deer walk nimbly down the bank,
pause at water’s edge to drink from the stream.

Bass breaks the water with a splash to catch
bugs flying lazily above the stream.

Sights and sounds that accompany the green
help me understand life along the stream.

The optional prompt at NaPoWriMo 2017 for Day 13 of National Poetry Writing Month/Global Poetry Writing Month is to write a ghazal. I’ve written a couple using my name in the final line, as is an option. But with a name like mine (Ken) that can grow old fast, so I hope you’ll understand why I’ve used a variant. ūüėČ
Ghazal ~ five or more couplets, lines the same length, meter not required
~ first couplet same end words; 1 to 3 words in 2nd lines repeated; rhyme РaA bA cA dA eA
~ (optional) internal rhyme in second lines, preceding repeated rhyme
~ possible naming or reference to author in last couplet
~ traditionally invoking melancholy, love, longing, and metaphysical questions, ghazals are often sung by Iranian, Indian, and Pakistani musicians

NaPoWriMo 2017GloPoWriMo 2017

Ghazals Revised

It comes to my attention that, in my first and second attempts, I misinterpreted the rules for writing a ghazal. I thought the first couplet is composed of two lines with end rhyme. In fact, the intention is for both lines to have the same end word, or words, as the second lines of the couplets that follow.
Considering that, I have revised the first couplets of those two poems so that each is a true ghazal.

Unwelcome Dawn

The dawn would come upon this night,
Repair my soul and end this night

Despite my loss, and with it pain
I don’t care to upend this night

But then, there are those close to me
Who say I should suspend this night

They see the darkness over me
Concerned for how I spend this night

Their words may hold a bit of truth
But I still hope to mend this night

So I must look within myself
With hope that I may ken this night


Inner Light 

These words are born within my heart
With warmth that’s held within my heart

The darkness that had taken root
And made its home within this heart

Would suffocate and take all life
That once had been within this heart

But then you came and with your light
Did shine true love within this heart

Fueled by the warmth there in your heart
I hold you close within this heart

Most willingly I keep that love
Now in my ken, within this heart


Ghazal
   ~ five or more couplets, lines the same length, meter not required
   ~¬†first couplet same end words; 1 to 3 words in 2nd lines repeated; rhyme – aA bA cA dA eA
   ~ (optional) internal rhyme in second lines, preceding repeated rhyme
   ~¬†possible naming or reference to author in last couplet
   ~ traditionally invoking melancholy, love, longing, and metaphysical questions, ghazals are          often sung by Iranian, Indian, and Pakistani musicians

Inner Light

Heart of the Matter

Inner Light 

With these few words, I must impart
The warmth that’s held within this heart

The darkness that had taken root
And made its home within this heart

Would suffocate and take all life
That once had been within this heart

But then you came and with your light
Did shine true love within this heart

Fueled by the warmth there in your heart
I hold you close within this heart

Most willingly I keep that love
Now in my ken, within this heart

In Carpe Diem Universal Jane #12 mountain view we are prompted to write a ghazal.  This is my second.  The first was in response to a prompt from Jane Dougherty, in April 2016.
Ghazal ~ five or more couplets, lines the same length, meter not required
~ first couplet same end words; 1 to 3 words in 2nd lines repeated; rhyme РaA bA cA dA eA
~ (optional) internal rhyme in second lines, preceding repeated rhyme
~ possible naming or reference to author in last couplet
~ traditionally invoking melancholy, love, longing, and metaphysical questions, ghazals are often sung by Iranian, Indian, and Pakistani musicians
Image source: ESO (European Southern Observatory) – Messier 17

*A review of this poem shows that is not a true ghazal, due to an error in the first couplet. It has been revised in a post on April 13, 2017.

Carpe Diem Haiku Kai.png

Unwelcome Dawn

Unwelcome Dawn

The Dawn, by John La Farge

The dawn would come and with its light
Repair my soul and end this night

Despite my loss, and with it pain
I don’t care to upend this night

But then, there are those close to me
Who say I should suspend this night

They see the darkness over me
Concerned for how I spend this night

Their words may hold a bit of truth
But I still hope to mend this night

So I must look within myself
With hope that I may ken this night

Jane Dougherty’s Poetry Challenge #44: Ghazal, offers The Dawn,¬†by¬†John La Farge, and the theme Dawn, with a prompt to write a ghazal (my first).
Ghazal ~ five or more couplets, the same length, meter not required
~ first couplet same end words; 1 to 3 words in 2nd lines repeated; rhyme РaA bA cA dA eA
~ (optional) internal rhyme in second lines, preceding repeated rhyme
~ possible naming or reference to author in last couplet
Image source: Wikipedia

*A review of this poem shows that is not a true ghazal, due to an error in the first couplet. It has been revised in a post on April 13, 2017.