The cat says

sleepwalking

La Somnambule (Sleep-Walker), by Marc Chagall

people
need to feed me
regardless of the hour
instead of cavorting under
the moon

Responding to Jane Dougherty’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #39: Sleep walking, Sarah, at fmme writes poems gave us three cinquian – The watcher says, The walker says and The moon says – so this is a response to her and a (late) response to Jane’s challenge.
Cinquain ~ a five line poem formatted with:
                  ~ a syllable count of 2-4-6-8-2
                  ~ let’s pretend I don’t know the rest of the format rules

Image source: marcchagallart.net

sleepwalker

sleepwalking

La Somnambule (Sleep-Walker), by Marc Chagall

moonbeams’
silent appeal
draws me into the night
heedless in my vivid blindness
moonlight

 

My second response to Jane Dougherty’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #39: Sleep walking, with La Somnambule (Sleep-Walker) painted by Marc Chagall, is a cinquain.
Cinquain ~ a five line poem formatted with:
                  ~ a syllable count of 2-4-6-8-2, or
                  ~ a word count of 1-2-3-4-1
                      with the second & third lines as descriptors,
                      the fourth line an emotion and
                      the fifth line a synonym or reflection of the first line

Image source: marcchagallart.net

cracked sky – #writephoto

cracked sky

remote
vision of home
through a rent in the night
longing for distant memories
far off

 

For my response to Sue Vincent’s (Daily Echo) Thursday Photo Prompt – Look Out – #writephoto,  I wrote a cinquain and layered Sue’s photo over a starscape to convey the image I saw in her photo – a tear in the fabric of space.
Cinquain ~ a five line poem formatted with:
                              ~ a syllable count of 2-4-6-8-2, or
                              ~ a word count of 1-2-3-4-1
                                  with the second & third lines as descriptors,
                                  the fourth line an emotion and
                                  the fifth line a synonym or reflection of the first line

Image source (bottom layer): Wikipedia, © Todd Vance, adapted as allowed through Creative Common license

Rainfall

Rainfall

rain
softly falling
much needed moisture
brings return of hope
relief
———
clouds burst

lightning flashes
wakening thirsty fields
washing away fears of a drought
rainfall

storm clouds
deliver rain
over once verdant fields
bring nature’s welcome offering
relief

 

Day Eight of 2016 NaPoWriMo.
Three poems on a theme, each a cinquain – the first using a word count, the second and third using a syllable count.

This is my response to Jane Dougherty’s Poetry challenge #25: CinquainJane also asks that we use one of these five words: fly, lightning, verdant, unfurl and softly.
Cinquain ~ a five line poem formatted with:
~ a syllable count of 2-4-6-8-2, or
~ a word count of 1-2-3-4-1
with the second & third lines as descriptors,
the fourth line an emotion and
the fifth line a synonym or reflection of the first line

Image source: wallpaperawesome.com

NaPoWriMo2016_8

Keyboard Kat

Keyboard Kat

Insistent
Sweetie Pie
Assertive black feline
Subtly staking out territory
Demanding

As I wrote my last poem, Age-Old Tears, a very belligerent cat squawked to let me know I should move over so she could lie on the couch, between me and the armrest.  I didn’t move, so she settled for the laptop.  I think it only fair that she get a poem out of it, another cinquain to meet Jane Dougherty’s Poetry challenge #6: Cinquain.  This one follows the word pattern 1-2-3-4-1.

Ken G.

Age-Old Tears

Age-Old Tears

Her tears
May seem to dry
To the unseeing eye
Grieving mother’s souls know only
Sorrow

Time
Is powerless
Holds no sway
Tears dry not with
Age

The Descent from the Cross_Rogier van der Weyden_Prado

This is my response to Jane Dougherty’s Poetry challenge #6: Cinquain
Cinquain – a five line poem formatted with:
– a syllable count of 2-4-6-8-2, or
– a word count of 1-2-3-4-1, with the second & third lines as descriptors,
the fourth line an emotion and the fifth line a synonym
or reflection of the first line
I have incorporated both formats into my poem.

Image source: Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, Spain
The Descent from the Cross (Deposition of Christ), by Rogier van der Weyden
I first wrote a poem inspired by this evocative painting six year ago (using the same title).  While understanding the significance associated with it, my immediate impression was the passion behind a mother’s tears.  Returning to it for my first attempt at a cinquain, I find that has not changed.

Ken G.