Poets Around the World ~ sijo

Poets Around the WorldI have covered many miles
       as a means to find friendship.
There have been many trips by air,
       over land, and under the sea.
Yet here I sit at home, conversing
       with poets around the world.

This poem is my response to Day 20 at napowrimo.net,
where we are challenged to write a sijo.
I wrote my first sijo in 2017 as a tribute to a lost cousin.

Sijo (a Korean verse form related to haiku and tanka)
~ three lines of 14-16 syllables each
~ a total of 44-46 syllables
~ a pause near the middle of each line
~ first half of the line contains six to nine syllables
~ the second half should contain no fewer than five
Originally intended as songs, sijo can treat romantic, metaphysical, or spiritual themes. Whatever the subject, the first line introduces an idea or story, the second supplies a “turn,” and the third provides closure.
Modern Sijo are sometimes printed in six lines.

Image source: Gyroscope Review

The heart of a tree suffers

The heart of a tree suffers

Whether it is a near-to-heart friend
or far-distant relative,
the heart of a tree suffers with
the death of a single branch.
When it is at the very heart,
all who know feel the loss.

This poem is in memory of Ken Thayer, a cousin who lost his battle with cancer, this past week.
This my first attempt at Sijo, in response to Carpe Diem Universal Jane #13 Sijo the Korean poem.

Sijo (a Korean verse form related to haiku and tanka)
~ three lines of 14-16 syllables each
~ a total of 44-46 syllables
~ a pause near the middle of each line
     ~ first half of the line contains six to nine syllables
     ~ the second half should contain no fewer than five
Originally intended as songs, sijo can treat romantic, metaphysical, or spiritual themes. Whatever the subject, the first line introduces an idea or story, the second supplies a “turn,” and the third provides closure.
Modern Sijo are sometimes printed in six lines.

Sketch artist: Natalie Bucki