Down in Flames ~ prosery

Down in Flames

We go in different directions down the imperturbable street, but how long can that be true? We carry the same signs, chant the same words calling for justice in a world too long without, but your way is far different than ours. They may be louder, but your words ring hollow. Your goal is to incite, giving you the freedom to wreak havoc while others pay.

Even then, your motives are clouded. Is it anarchy, a wish to overthrow the establishment as so many claim, or is it merely an opportunity to loot and vandalize, damn the very people we march to protect? Actions such as yours only solidify the hatred in the narrow minds we try so hard to change, guaranteeing our defeat.

You throw your first flaming bottle, a window breaks, and I know the streets will never be the same again.

This bit of flash fiction is my response to Prosery Monday: Different Directions, presented by Merril at dVerse Poets Pub. With Prosery, the challenge is to write a piece of flash fiction with a 144-word limit. Included in the bit of prose is to be a complete line from a poem. For this prompt, the line to be included is “We go in different directions down the imperturbable street,” from “An Aspect of Love, Alive in the Ice and Fire,”  by Gwendolyn Brooks.  My flash fiction also meets the additional challenge of hitting the 144-word mark, exactly.  Other entries can be read here.

Image source: foxbusiness.com

20 thoughts on “Down in Flames ~ prosery

  1. I think the looters have no agenda but to steal, too ignorant to know (or care) the damage they’re doing to their own neighborhood, and their own people. They put a proverbial knee on the neck of their own. I hope the massive reaction this time will have a positive effect.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. My sister-in-law in Oakland says it’s well-known there that most of the destruction comes from outsiders bent on causing trouble, each with their own agenda that has nothing to do with whatever cause is being protested. I think they have discovered that is true here in NYC too. If it’s indeed righteous anger, it’s totally misdirected (let’s put the police violence into that category too). (K)

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Starting with the prompt line means it drives the prose, and this piece is expertly driven, Ken. It’s of the moment and has a circularity that emphasises the message. When history repeats itself, it loses its way. The question is so pertinent: Is it anarchy, a wish to overthrow the establishment as so many claim, or is it merely an opportunity to loot and vandalize, damn the very people we march to protect?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. An excellent take on the prompt and an excellent poem depicting the motives people have for protesting and marching. I had to take my poem about the marches down. It seemed to come across to harsh. I like what you have done here.

    Liked by 1 person

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